Fall 2022 Course List

The School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership offers four distinct academic tracks in its undergraduate curriculum.

  • Moral and Political Thought
  • American Political Thought
  • Economic Thought and Political Economy
  • Leadership and Statesmanship for the 21st Century

To graduate with a BA or a BS degree in civic and economic thought and leadership, students are required to take at least one course from each academic track in addition to the required core courses. A variety of upper-division courses are offered in each track every semester to allow you to tailor your academic experience in SCETL to your own goals and interests.

If you are looking for spring 2022 graduate courses, click here

Schedule an advising appointment. 

"SCETL is kind of a mix of a few things. You get economics, you get history, you get philosophy all blended into one, which is a really cool and unique experience to be able to hear from all of these different schools of thought and you get to challenge yourself." - Justin H. 

Required Core Courses

CEL 100 Great Ideas of Politics and Ethics (HU)

Introduces fundamental debates and ideas of politics in both the West and beyond. Surveys ancient, medieval and modern thinkers — such as Plato and Aristotle, Aquinas and Augustine, Machiavelli, Locke, and Rousseau — tracing their influences on contemporary debates with a focus on the great questions of human nature, social and political life, and the relationship between religion and politics. 

Enrollment requirements: Credit is allowed for only CEL 100 or CEL 194 (Great Ideas of Politics and Ethics)
Professor(s): 
M/W 1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. | Luke Perez | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #91665)
M/W 3 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. | Trevor Shelley | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #92044)
M/W/F 9:05 a.m. - 9:55 a.m. | Luke Perez | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #83211)
M/W/F 10:10 a.m. - 11 a.m. | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #81469)
M/W/F 11:15 a.m. - 12:05 p.m. | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #88626)
T/Th 10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. | Emily Rap | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #91658)
T/Th 9 a.m. - 10:15 a.m. | Peter McNamara | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #84950)
T/Th 3 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. | J. Kent Wright | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #94858)
T/Th 12 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #89290)
T/Th 12 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #91980)
T/Th 3 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #83723)

Available as an iCourse
Class #84514

CEL 200 Great Debates in American Politics (HU)

Introduces fundamental ideas and debates about liberty and equality in American thought from the colonial era to the present, focusing on major political figures and issues--ideas that continue to shape political debates in 21st-century America, thus providing crucial foundations for future leadership roles in either public affairs or the private sector.

Enrollment requirements: Credit is allowed for only CEL 200 or CEL 294 (Great Debates in American Politics and Economics)

Professor(s): 
M/W/F 9:05 a.m. - 9:55 a.m. | S. Adam Seagrave| Tempe Campus (Session B: Class #88628)
T/Th 10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. | Zachary German | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #88629)
T/Th 1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. | Sean Beienburg | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #88630)
T/Th 3 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. | Zachary German | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #84517)

Available as an iCourse
Session B: Class #86214

CEL 300 Debating Capitalism

Explores and debates the politics, economics and morality of capitalism — the system of society that allows space for markets, profit-seeking and money-making. Also gives a broad introduction to the study of political economy. Readings cover the period from antiquity to modern commercial society.
T/Th 12 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. | Peter McNamara | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #81467

CEL 475 Statesmanship and American Grand Strategy (HU)

Discusses great ideas and figures in political leadership and statesmanship, from ancient Greece and early modern Europe to America's founding and the present global uncertainty, especially the major arguments about war, peace and international affairs--ideas that shape foreign policy and grand strategy debates in the 21st century, thus providing crucial foundations for future leadership roles.
M/W 10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. | Paul Carrese | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #89288)

Moral and Political Thought

CEL 394 Comparative Political Thought

M/W 1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. | Karen Taliaferro | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #94866)

CEL 375 Politics and Leadership in the Age of Revolutions 1776-1826

T/Th 10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. | J. Kent Wright | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #94802)

CEL 494 Faith and Reason

Do religion and science complement each other or conflict? What are the limits of religious authority? How do political forces affect religious institutions -- and vice versa? This class explores these and other questions primarily through an immersive historical role-playing game, The Trial of Galileo: Aristotelianism, the New Cosmology, and the Catholic Church, which takes place in 17th century Rome as bishops, professors and scientists confront findings of modern science that clash with the Aristotelian cosmology which had informed Catholic philosophy and teaching for centuries. Beyond close reading of primary texts from the era, students will assume roles, from Cardinals and Jesuits to members of the Medici family, the Italian scientist Federico Cesi and, of course, Galileo himself. They will engage in debates over the nature of faith and the role of science in obtaining knowledge about the world, and ultimately hold Galileo Galilei's infamous trial.

 
M 4:50 p.m. - 7:35 p.m. | Karen Taliaferro | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #96010)

CEL 494 Literary Leaders


T 4:50 p.m. - 7:35 p.m. | Colleen Sheehan | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #89294)

American Political Thought

CEL 494 American Constitution I

M/W 1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. | Aaron Kushner | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #88635)

CEL 494 Tocqueville on American Democracy

M/W 4:50 p.m. - 7:35 p.m. | Daniel Mahoney | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #95788)

Economic Thought and Political Economy

CEL 350 Philosophy, Politics and Economics

Prepares the foundation for students to become active participants, as citizens and leaders, in a liberal democratic society that faces an uncertain future. Provides familiarity with core conceptual tools provided by philosophy, politics and economics, and an appreciation for the foundation they provide together to address social and political uncertainties we face today as well as in the future. Reliance on any one disciplinary set of tools and skills is useful, of course, but the real challenges of any liberal democracy are met by neither technocratic nor bureaucratic solutions. They require an awareness of the relevance of ethics, politics and economics, as well as an appreciation for the limitations of each and the necessity of thinking through their interactions.

M/W 1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #94803)

CEL 304 Classical to Modern Economic Thought

A survey of economic thought from classical to modern economics; including classical economics, Marxist economics, neoclassical economics, institutionalist economics, Austrian economics, Keynesian economics, Chicago economics, new institutionalist economics, and public choice.

T/Th 1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. | Ross Emmett | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #95560)

Leadership and Statesmanship for the 21st Century

CEL 494 Globalism, Nationalism and Citizenship

M/W 4:30 p.m. - 5:45 p.m. | Trevor Shelley | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #88636)

CEL 394 Civilian-Military Relations

This will be a seminar-style class that will review the foundational principles that underlie civil-military relations (CMR) in the United States, identify the historic and current civil-military controversies and explore the “big ideas” often associated with this topic. Student presentations and guest instructors will supplement the assigned readingWe will explore the foundational American principle of civilian control of the military, military professionalism, the "right to be wrong" theory of civilian control and the long-standing norm prohibiting the active military from participating in partisan politics, among other issues. The course will also examine the widely discussed civilian-military "gap," and the claim that the U.S. military is increasingly isolated from civilian society, and what that means for CMR in the U.S.. We will also investigate the claim that the U.S. military is now too “woke” to be effective on the battlefield. This will include reviewing the role gender, race and sexual orientation play in the 21st-century military. The class will also explore civilian attitudes toward the military (and vice versa) and recent controversies concerning the Trump administration’s decision to use the active military in response to political protests in support of domestic law enforcement. We will draw from a wide array of resources, including Eliot Cohen, Samuel Huntington and Gen. James Mattis. Learning objectives: Identify and become familiar with the relevant constitutional framework, the history of civil-military relations in the United States, applicable CMR norms and current civil-military challenges in the U.S.. 

T/Th 1:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m. | Bruce Pagel | Tempe Campus (Session C: Class #89036)

CEL 394 Leadership & Service GIE: India

12 a.m. - 12 a.m. | Susan Carrese (Session C: Class #90481)

CEL 429 Studies European Literature and Culture

T/Th | 12 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. | Ileana Orlich (Session C: Class #93695)

Course Spotlights

Explore the roots of political order, from ancient Greece to modern India or study the debates over fundamental American principles! Hear directly from our students and faculty on what civic and economic thought and leadership courses are all about.